Dalia Idli (Cracked Wheat Recipe With Steamed Dumplings): A Diabetes Friendly Recipe

dalia idli
Broken wheat recipes for weight loss are getting widely popular.If you are here for a diabetes friendly recipe, then this one will come in handy.

I love cracked wheat for its sheer range of health benefits. For a long time, I have been wanting to make idlis with dalia (broken wheat), but never had the courage. But my recent successful experiments with oats, ragi, and buckwheat idlis prompted me to go ahead with broken wheat as the main ingredient. So here I am with dalia idli - hubby simply loved these super soft, full of nutrition idlis.

Dalia /Broken Wheat
As a rich source of fiber, cracked wheat aids in digestion. As a result, it aids in weight loss and weight management. It supplies your body with its regular dose of manganese. A rich source of protein and enzymes.



Cracked Wheat Benefits
Whole grains, such as cracked wheat, are a holy grail for weight loss, helping you maintain a healthy body weight. Also known as bulgar wheat, daliya or dalia comprises grains of wheat crushed into smaller pieces. These cracked berries of whole wheat are a rich source of calcium, zinc, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, folate, vitamin B1, B2, B3, and fiber.

The magnesium content in cracked wheat helps activate certain enzymes that play a key role in balancing out insulin and glucose levels. This is the reason wheat for diabetics is a safer, healthier alternative to rice. There are numerous healthy cracked wheat recipes to help you maintain blood sugar and manage diabetes.

The body requires insulin to break down sugar in food. When the body is not able to produce enough insulin, it could cause high blood sugar levels, which risk causing diabetes. By nourishing your body with whole grains, you are essentially providing it with the means to control blood glucose levels and cholesterol, preventing diabetes from developing.

According to a research study done by Harvard Medical School, women taking whole grains, such as whole wheat flour or cracked wheat, regularly had consistently lower weights compared to those who used refined flour.




Properties
Cracked wheat benefits health in more ways than one. It :
  • ·         Is loaded with fiber – ¼ cup of dalia contains 5g of fiber
  • ·         Has no saturated fat
  • ·         Does not contain trans fat
  • ·         Has no cholesterol-raising properties
  • ·         Is an excellent source of minerals, vitamins, and fiber
  • ·         Makes an excellent addition to your low-fat diet


Cracked wheat nutritional values speak for its health benefits claims.

1/4th cup of dalia provides
5g of fiber
8 percent of the recommended daily intake of iron
10 percent of protein

 Replacing refined flours with cracked wheat in recipes adds additional nutritional value. Baking with broken wheat or adding it to any dishes raises its nutrition.

Wondering how to cook cracked wheat? 

Here is one of my most favorite cracked wheat recipes - steamed dumplings or dalia idli, as it is popularly known in Indian homes.

Ingredients
1 cup- dalia (cracked wheat)
1/2 cup - suji (semolina)
1 cup - curd
2 pinches of baking soda
little water for batter
veggies of your choice - I added capsicum, carrot, and peas
Salt

Procedure
broken wheat

  1. Dry roast dalia. Let it cool.
  2. Mix with suji and curd.
  3. Add salt. Keep aside for 10 minutes.
  4. Add grated/chopped veggies.
  5. Next add the required amount of water to make idli batter.
  6. Grease idli moulds.
  7. Add baking soda and steam until done.
  8. Enjoy with chutney of your choice.
  9. I made tomato-onion chutney and coconut-almond chutney.
  10. You may want to try roasted Bengal gram chutney. It is sure to tickle your taste buds. Check recipe here.
  11. Do not forget to check dalia idli toast - yes, you have heard it right. This is a must-try broken wheat recipe or for that matter idli recipe. Now I hope you do not have any doubts as to how to cook cracked wheat. 
Feedback on dalia idli:


Rajgira-Kuttu Roti for Vrat

rajgira-kuttu/singhara roti
I am in love with singhara/kuttu roti since childhood, especially mom-made singhara parantha is something I miss here in Delhi. But now I have the courage to roll it out myself. Thankfully, I am introduced to another healthy grain - amaranth or rajgira. Never before did I knew that sil (rajgira) ladoo that I relish so much are made of a flour that is loaded with health benefits. I will do another page on amaranth benefits.

I had bought one amaranth seeds packet a few months back to make my favorite ladoos. But I haven't yet tried to do so. I was wondering what else I could do with these rajgira seeds. Got the idea to grind these seeds into powder and then make rotis with it. Voila! My experiment worked again.

Thanks to rajgira flour, I did not find the dough sticky and it was easy to roll out chapatis.

Let's get to the recipe for vrat roti or amaranth-singhara/kuttu roti:

Ingredients
vrat aloo

1/2 cup- amaranth flour
1/2 cup- kuttu or singhara atta
2-3 potatoes
salt as per taste
cumin seeds
water - as required
Oil - for roasting the rotis







Procedure


  1. Mix everything well, except water.
  2. We will need little water for the dough.
  3. Make a soft dough. 
  4. Make lemon-size balls of dough and roll out chapatis with hand.
  5. Do not try to make thin rotis. These will be little thick.
  6. Put on tawa. Roast one side with little ghee.
  7. Then roast next side.
  8. Enjoy with aloo and rajgira kadhi. I made dhaniya-pudina chutney as well, with no onion, garlic. 


Kadhi for Fast; Rajgira Kadhi

vrat kadhi
Kadhi is a widely popular in north India, especially Punjabi homes. Then there is a special Guajarati Kadhi and Rajasthani Kadhi as well. We can savor kadhi everyday. Now you can relish your favorite kadhi during fasting days as well. How? Let's see!

Take all the ingredients that you are allowed to enjoy during fast:






Ingredients
1 cup- dahi (curd)
2 tbsp- rajgira atta (amaranth)
sendha namak
green chilly/red chilly
ginger (if allowed) - we need ginger-chilly paste
coriander leaves
sabut dhaniya
2 cups of water (or more if you want the kadhi more watery)
Roasted almond powder
Jeera (cumin seeds)
Ghee (clarified butter)

Procedure
rajgira kadhi for vrat


  1. Mix curd and singhara atta.
  2. Make sure there aren't any lumps.
  3. Add salt and water. Whisk well.
  4. Dry roast 8-10 almonds. Let them cool and then grind into powder. Usually most recipes use peanut powder, but I always substitute it with almonds.
  5. Take a deep bottom vessel.
  6. Add ghee.
  7. When the ghee is hot, add jeera and sabut dhaniya.
  8. Let them splutter.
  9. Next add ginger-chilly paste (if you are not using ginger, add chilly).
  10. Stir fry.
  11. Now add the dahi batter.
  12. Keep stirring so that it does not curdle.
  13. Keep it on low flame while stirring intermittently.
  14. Add roasted almond powder.
  15. Stir in between. The kadhi will be ready in 10-15 minutes. I kept it longer though.
  16. Enjoy the kadhi for fast with rajgira-kuttu roti.


vrat thali - rajgira kadhi, spiced aloo, dhaniya-pudina chutney
Here's my vrat thali today. To check recipe for soft and sumptuous rajgira-kuttu roti, click here.

My Food Story

myfoodstory
Food was never a passion, nor was I a food lover ever. I am not a foodie still. But what drove me into cooking was a self-imposed "challenge."
Before marriage, I would only make simple dal and rotis - this is all that I learned, since I was more into studies and my dad always wanted his daughters to earn laurels outside the kitchen. I am proud to say I have tried to live up to his expectations (though I failed to be an IAS officer, which was his dream). Nevertheless I have assumed the role of an entrepreneur through my abilities, God's & parents' blessings, & my hubby's support. My dad remains my inspiration, and my hubby my guide.
I got married to the boy of my choice - yes, it was a love-cum-arrange marriage (where a Punjabi girl tied the nuptial knot with an Odiya boy from a traditional Odiya family).
My in-laws are Odiyas, and their food habits, style of cooking, and the value given to food & cooking are completely different from what I have learnt during my upbringing in a Punjabi family, with a working mother. Hats off to my mom for doing all that she has done for her kids despite working day & night. Not to take away the credit from my dad, he has been a pillar of support all through - fulfilling all our wishes always.
How It All Started
Nevertheless even five years into my marriage, I had not developed interest in the kitchen despite my hubby being a foodie, and fortunately, Mr. Husband has never forced me to do what I have never wanted to. Of course, I am a working woman and have always given priority to my work!
Here I must tell I have been really lucky to have a mom-like mother-in-law, who has never asked me to go to kitchen (I only make tea at my in-law's place), as she loves to cook for family - whenever we visit Odisha, she is the one who always cooks !!!! Lucky me!
However, my interest in cooking and learning the art of making sumptuous dishes was aroused at a traditional ceremony in my hubby's side in 2013, wherein I had a role to play in the kitchen. Since I was neither interested in cooking, nor had tried to learn any traditional Odiya recipes for the ceremony, my role was cut short. This came as a shocker to me. Yes, I felt hurt but motivated myself to take it up as a challenge. That's when I joined a few food groups and got the confidence to begin my experiments in the kitchen.
I am still learning and my exploits in the kitchen continue. I have always been a health freak. So now my focus has shifted to establishing a balance between taste & health (& of course my work life). Still a long long way to go! Let's see how far I go smile emoticon
I am happy that I have been able to make some really delicious experimental dishes that I could never think of. My food story won't be complete without the mention of Bhabani Sankar Mohapatra (my hubby's brother in law), who has been a motivator all through - when I started with my food experiments, I did not have the courage to post my food pics in food groups, so I would Whatsapp him all my kitchen exploits. He continues to encourage me as always!


From aam papad to cake rusk, from cookies to cakes, from snacks to savories and sweets, I have a host of healthy recipes under my belt. But yes, I have had my share of failures as well - not every experiment is a hit. I fail in the kitchen sometimes- but the never-say-die attitude keeps me on my toes and never lets me give up until I pass with flying colors!
I am glad I have never chosen an unhealthy ingredient for my food experiments and shall continue to do so.
This is my food story - something that has become an integral part of my life. I have made hundreds of friends in food groups - with some becoming a part of life. My food story & exploits will continue as long as I am alive -and I would be happy if I could bring a change to the life of even a single person and convince them to take to healthy eating.

#womensday #mystory
Moms are moms - The phrase "God could not be everywhere so he created mothers" reflects clearly on the lives of each one of us. Sober, cool, caring, hardworking, and affectionate - this is how I would describe my ma. My mom is an extremely simple woman, who has worked hard day & night along with dad, to ensure her kids had everything they yearned for. She has been protective of her three kids and always been the support we needed, encouraging us to tread moral paths and being our source of strength always. I am proud to be her daughter, who has always taught her daughters to be supportive of their new families. I credit her for imbibing family values in us. Now my mom is also a mother in law and she continues to be in her mom avatar even for her daughter in law. My mom often says,”Meri betiyan apne ghar chali gaye, ab yehi meri beti hai.” Love her spirit of womanhood - this is what daughters in law need from their moms in law.... Love you mom for all that you do and have done for us and your daughter in law. 


Now that we are talking about saluting the women of today, I cannot forget to mention my mother in law. She is a super woman, though traditional to the core. Despite being an orthodox woman, she accepted a girl from a different religion, region, culture, and zero culinary skills as her daughter in law (yea, that's me). This shows she has a heart of gold – which beats for her family, especially kids. She is a figure of sacrifice and love, who overcame all the hardships posed by her mother in law with flying colors and continued to look after her MIL when she was suffering from a fatal disease. But she has never tried to replicate her MIL when it comes to dealing with her own DILs. She is more like a mom than an MIL – who cooks for us all and is happy to serve her daughters in law, without expecting anything in return. A big salute to bau (my MIL).

About Me

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